Monthly Archives: October 2010

What Do You Think Of When You Hear “Continental Breakfast’?

 

  It seems as if about thirty years ago hotels and motels began to offer a ‘complementary continental breakfast’ with a nights stay. That was great, especially if you had a family. For a family of four or five a breakfast could easily cost about half again the price of a room. To the disappointment of many a ‘complementary breakfast’ normally consist of granola, a bagel, two-day-old donut, orange colored water, and black water.
  The word ‘complementary’ means to complete something. What is being completed? A bad night in a motel made worse.
  The granola is made up of the throwaway raisin bran from the county jail, oats purchased from the local feed and grain, and a touch of sweetened STP oil treatment to bind it. If you don’t eat that donut your first morning it’s scraped of the glaze and becomes the bagel the next morning. The orange juice is diluted Tang with spaghetti bits from the garbage disposal of the nearest Italian place as pulp. Coffee is from the bottom shelf at Odd Lots and probably ground by the transmission of a ’79 Omni five speed in a remote village in Panama (everybody knows the best beans come from plantations irrigated from canal water).
  In ’03, my wife and I went to London and Budapest. Our travel brochure said that we would have a ‘complementary continental breakfast’ with our room. We planned to eat out. After all, what are the English known for, figgy pudding, crumpets, and chips and gravy. Other than goulash the Hungarians’ only contribution to the culinary world is… – Attila the Hun.
  To our surprise, ‘continental breakfast’ has an entire different meaning on ‘the continent.’
At the hotel in London and Budapest, there was no less than thirty-two feet of table filled with ‘continental breakfast’ items. Everything was on the tables from cured meats, every type of potato imaginable, eggs anyway you want them, fruits, pastries creps, French Toast, various types of pancakes – the list could go on and on.
  This past spring my wife and I stayed in a motel on the Oregon coast that featured a ‘continental breakfast.’ I was overcome by how grateful Americans really are. As I heard them sip Panamanian coffee and crunch on a toasted bagel they would say, “Not a bad little breakfast.”
  When Europeans think ‘continental’ they see a blend and mixture of various cultures. Perhaps when American hotel and motel owners think of ‘continental’ they have in mind the continent of Antarctica.

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Jerry Lucas, Doctor Memory, Recalls When Basketball Was Just A Game

There was a time when basketball was a game.
When growing up in the fifties and sixties in Ohio if you played basketball the name Jerry Lucas was either before or after the word ‘basketball.’ I could not see enough of him playing. Televised games were sparse in those days. Sports programming was nearly non-existent. There were no replays. If you didn’t see it the first time, it was gone forever.
Watching Jerry Lucas play at Ohio State was like an ice cream sundae. He was absolutely the best. He carried himself like a gentleman. He displayed no ego. Everything about him was about the team. I never heard his voice until a brief courtside interview at an all-star game.
Players now can’t get in front of a camera or microphone enough to talk about themselves or what matters to them (which are themselves). They treat fans like subjects and slaves. They don’t respect them.
Jerry’s life has taken him far from the glamour world of ego-driven sports. He has written many books on learning, education and memory. He also has a website, www.Doctormemory.com, featuring products designed to help people’s memories. Basketball has become a means to an end.
Jerry Lucas produced a film called, The Perfect Summer. It is the recollections of men who loved and played basketball because it was a game. Jerry is the most famous of the dozen or so men that recall the days at Sunset Park in Middletown, Ohio during the fifties. Much as in his playing days, he shares the ball with his teammates and is there for the rebounds and tip-ins.
Jerry does take time to focus on his accomplishments, not in a way to promote how great he was (is), but what he has accomplished. In the movie, he seems to hide in the background. From what is remembered about his playing days, it is not a surprise.
The production is http://www.mefeedia.com/watch/22076041. It is an opportunity to listen to one of the foremost memory experts in the world remember a time with his buddies when basketball was just a game.

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